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Something I've been meaning to ask about being time-ex.

Stevienics

Warrant Officer
1000+ Posts
4,931
107
63
Early next year I'm hitting bus pass age and for the second time I am leaving (being shoved off) the opus-dei of the uniformed branches. It's fair to say that when I left last time I made a rare old cock up of it and felt completely directionless for months - though this time at 65 it will be different.

I've got a bit of a plan this time - and the finances are somewhat better positioned, but I need to know something from you:

What kept you sane when you don't have anyone to rely on you doing what you used to do?

I'm aware this is forever this time - however long this is. I know in my bones I have no place now being amongst the lithe, handsome and the active - but is this it? What keeps you interested in breathing in and out after a life of sheet mental living?
 

Oldstacker

Warrant Officer
1000+ Posts
2,114
420
83
I too am wondering the same thing. I hit 65 next year and get my state pension at 66, I am planning on going part-time at some point next year. I don't really want to work beyond state pension age - men in my family tend to die young - so I am pondering what life will be like after work. I have some family tree research that needs more time than I can spare at the moment but I am aware that there is also a tendency not to do such things because "there's always tomorrow". How do we stay motivated and generate the enthusiasm to keep going?
 

busby1971

Super Moderator
Staff member
1000+ Posts
6,929
564
113
Two tips I’ve been given are, have enough money to treat every day like a Saturday, ie be able to afford to do stuff, and the other is have something to do and be where there is stuff to.

I also think you need to slow work down towards the end, this could be moving to a calmer position or taking a few days back, I’ve seen a few people from max output with overtime etc to nothing and for some that transition is too hard. I’m still young enough to have my commuted pension but if I could get a 3 or 4 day a week job, doing what i do, I’d try to make it work.
 

Billy Whizz

Flight Sergeant
1000+ Posts
1,384
19
38
Went Part time when I left in Jan (timex) - 3 days a week. Extra money to top up the pension and see where the cost of living crisis went mainly. Now the extra income is going on final house improvements. Am busier outside of work, with lots of volunteering activities for animal rescue centre and wildlife organisations. All very rewarding and active. When the time comes that wages are merely going into the bank and not required for day to day living, it'll be full time retirement but will mean 7 days free for volunteering not 4.
 

dctyke

Corporal
216
37
28
First thing is to remember you are no longer in the RAF and folks should stop acting as if they are. The RAF moves on and you will be forgotten, just look forward to that money in the bank every month. if you feel the need to reminisce there are plenty of Facebook sites. Get an active hobby and get out and about.
 

Past Engineering

Sergeant
Subscriber
758
34
28
Things I do/did:

DIY jobs that had to be squeezed in and rushed over a weekend can now be done less stressfully and to a higher standard, both for us and my daughters’ families, spend more time with grandchildren and daughters.

The ability to go for a day out, or longer breaks when we want and not have to bother about booking time off and then catching up when back in work.

Modelling, I have a few models on the go, spending time reading various forums, able to chill out in front of the TV/computer (wife’s needs dependent), jigsaws, reading, I also registered as self employed and did some work from home for a friend on researching new regulations the company he worked for were applying for and writing/amending his companies documents accordingly.

Instead of doing as I was told by bosses, I now have my wife in that role as I am now in her domain all the time and it took time to get used to having me under her feet, I d have a set of household chores she has given me, which grew as I helped her through breast cancer treatment/operation which I also had time to give without affecting work.

Do I miss work, not a jot, am I calmer, less stressed and happier, yes I am.
 

Wobbly_Jon

Corporal
350
32
28
I pulled the yellow and black handle some 9 years ago all be it from my civvy job and haven't looked back. I did F/Al for three months then started to look for something to keep me sane and out of Mrs W_J's way.
So being a time served mech eng I ended up in a volunteer mechanic/engineer) role at a local hertiage railway and really enjoy my two or three days per week getting mucky and learning or re-learning things, playingwith steam loco's and more importantly keeping mind a body ticking over.
You need to do something so when you have caught up with all the things you've been putting off pick something you enjoy, learn something new, etc.
 

Tin basher

Knackered Old ****
Staff member
Subscriber
1000+ Posts
9,216
707
113
I retired early at 60 so have been on Easy Street for sometime. Now the worlds your lobster, life is one long weekend. The very worst thing is to do is nothing, just sitting drinking a cuppa watching the ITV racing all day will find the grim reaper making an early appearance. Do your best to maintain a little bit of fitness, use or lose it but don’t overdo it. Recovery times are longer now. Find a hobby, sport or activity that you enjoy and go for it. TB’s top tip never shop on a weekend that’s what the workers do, go midweek shopping. Go to a nice local pub twice a week, same pub, same days and meet people, interact with others expand your social circle and it gets you out of the house. Sort the garden, decorate the house, do that job that her indoors has been nagging about for years, keep active. Me I play golf 4 days a week, my visits to the pub have got me in the darts team. We are rubbish we only won one game last season and are yet to win one this season, but that doesn’t matter it’s the chance for banter and beer. Most important enjoy the heck out of it. Money don’t worry about it just plan sensibly and remember the state will keep topping up the bank balance on a very very regular basis.
 

fourteen2two

Corporal
335
93
28
I retired in 2014, no regrets. 24 years RAF, 18 in FE. Wife left NHS that year too, but a few months after me.
We have travelled extensively and continue to do so. We have a touring caravan which we usecin UK and EU.
Have done some cruises and fly and stay trips to get some sun in winter.
We avoid peak times ( no kids and lower prices!). Also do mid week shopping.
It's nice to go off when we please. Pursue hobbies and try to get out walking most days. So far no major health issues.
 

4mastacker

Flight Sergeant
1000+ Posts
1,420
150
63
I joined the local canal restoration society which gets me out of the house. It's good outdoor exercise and we have many on-going projects which keep the brain and the body active. I've also learned brick-laying, driving an excavator, boat driving as well as applying some of my trade skills when it comes to looking after and storing the multitude of kit that we use. The volunteers come from all sorts of backgrounds and share a common interest in supping tea and eating home-made cakes - it's like a water-based Mens' Shed.
 

Tin basher

Knackered Old ****
Staff member
Subscriber
1000+ Posts
9,216
707
113
With luck in 6 months time you'll wonder how you ever managed to fit 40 hours of something else (work) into your busy week.😀
 

Oldstacker

Warrant Officer
1000+ Posts
2,114
420
83
😀 lots of good ideas there, thanks all. Part of what has made me think about it is that I know of someone who used ill health, exacerbated by smoking and drinking way too much, as an excuse to stop working rather than a planned retirement and he is now doing nothing except rotting away.
 

Stevienics

Warrant Officer
1000+ Posts
4,931
107
63
Amazing ideas there, beyond my meagre plans. I’ve spent a year truly kicking the arse out of resettlement training - nearly time to launch the boat! WWW.HiFlite.co.uk
 

norfolkred1

Sergeant
880
50
28
I joined a driver agency doing the odd day a week just to keep from in front of the TV. Getting to the stage of sod it and fully retire at the age of 62. House, cars, etc all paid for and living off the pension and basically SKI (Spend the Kids Inheritance) we have a local club called the TOFY (The Over Fifty's Youth) Club which is on 3 days a week covering all sorts of activities for a certain age group, I shall be joining soon enough.
 

Vushtrri

Sergeant
593
61
28
I retired? 13 yrs ago after PVR ing and transferring pension to the Police.. then became a school caretaker..then worked for FCO abroad..fell out with their working practices so became a caretaker again, now nearly 65 & seem to be working more hrs than ever for son in law. Keeps me in beer and chainsaws..
 

muttywhitedog

Retired Rock Star 5.5.14
1000+ Posts
4,568
621
113
I'm going to look at reducing my hours in 2024 with a view to calling time in the next couple of years. There are some people there in their 70s still working full time. Not because they are skint, but because they fear they will have no purpose in life if they dont work. I dont want to wait too late and end up in that category. I plan to be gone before I hit 60 - I'll have enough saved to get me through to 67 and my state pension without counting the pennies.
 

Late & Tired

Flight Sergeant
1000+ Posts
1,126
143
63
First thing is to remember you are no longer in the RAF and folks should stop acting as if they are. The RAF moves on and you will be forgotten, just look forward to that money in the bank every month. if you feel the need to reminisce there are plenty of Facebook sites. Get an active hobby and get out and about.
An absolutely superb reply! Fully concur.
 

Rigga

Licensed Aircraft Engineer
1000+ Posts
Licensed A/C Eng
2,157
120
63
I have now spent longer out of the RAF as I did in…24 years in. True, I changed careers to a better Life but I still meet with old mates and ex-colleagues. We still have banter and rejoin old conversations that started years ago. When you walk through those gates you will no longer be welcome without going through the guardroom and treated as a threat. Your mates will still remember you but the RAF will not.
You will get over it, get more involved with something you like to do and find new acquaintances who may later become friends. You might join a Bridge Club, your local church choir or something more sociable… you will feel slightly alone and exposed for a few months - but you’ll get over it.
Have a great retirement!

P.S. - I’m 66 and looking forward to my (extended) retirement next year, too.
 
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